Flu and Herbs

 

Tea ledge
Herbal teas for ailing grey days: Ginger, lemon and Honey (repeat)

How do you do 🙂

I am recovering from what we think must have been the flu, but doing much better!  I feel like I am back to my old self and will return to the world of making, using my hands and senses, I can’t wait!

But I did just spend several days with the sole purpose of expelling a flu, thinking about plants but mostly sleeping.  But I’m ready to move on…

Cozy
Companions in ill health – notice Henry’s foot over Pangur!

I strangely enjoy the challenge of being sick.  I like to see how I can expel the sickness with old remedies (on top of lots of rest).  This week, after a shift in the library and a meeting with the spinners guild (yes, I joined the spinner’s guild and have a wheel on loan!) I felt the slow creeping sickness in my chest.  After Jamie’s company Christmas party on Saturday, I knew I was definitely sick…

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My view for the past several days!  Today, I was under the sun during a lunch break and got to breath in the salty air ❤

And so, I made a huge pot of broth using the hardy plants in the garden: Kale, loads of parsley, thyme, sage, rosemary. etc. with rutabaga, beet root and the habanero peppers I picked and dried this summer.  Luckily, I didn’t have to go into town for work until today so had 3 solid days to dedicate to my well being ❤

I wanted to share a wee bit with you about one of these wonderful sunlight consuming greens…

P L A N T  A L L Y

S A G E

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A woman collecting sage from a waddled garden bed with a beautifully woven basket (I like how the earth looks like it has been severed in the foreground), Tacuinum Sanitatis, c. 1400

Sage (Salveo) meaning, ‘I am well.’

Such a beautiful herb!  When I am feeling unwell, I add sage to everything! The medieval era loved sage and saw it as a plant of immortality.  I’ve always been interested in the medieval plant world.  What did their gardens look like?  How did they use their plants? How did they interact with them?  Sage is one herb that always stood out in this era as an optimum health tonic. In the 12th century poem, Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum the author proclaims, “Why should a man die in whose garden sage grows?  Against the power of death there is no medicine in our gardens; but sage calms the nerves, takes away hand tremors, and helps cure acute fever… O sage! The saviour! of nature the conciliator!”

Aside from the fun historical perspective that stretches back well before the 11th-15th century (Much herbal and plant knowledge was derived from rewritten texts from the ancient world), Sage is known to be an ANTI INFLAMMATORY agent –  It also suppresses perspiration, aids memory and digestion!  I have three plants growing right by our front door, for a woman is said to rule where sage grows 😉

** Sage is toxic in large quantities, so do take precaution! **

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S A N G E (sage) on the right, from “The Tudor Pattern Book”

 

Anywho!  I best get some rest so I can start tomorrow anew, refreshed and well after 3 solid days of dedicating myself to consuming herbal broths and teas curled by the fire (Also watched the new Planet Earth – it’s superb!).  Currently reading The Sea Road by Margaret Elphinstone while I wait for The Good People by Hannah Kent to come into the library (So very excited!!).

Hope you’re well and escaping the flu season this year! Onward!

Slán!

Julia

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Fairisle Mitts in Single Ply – flu type project that seems never ending

3 thoughts on “Flu and Herbs

  1. I was traveling when you posted this, Julia, hence my late comment.

    Yes, homemade remedies from nature are the best. My go-to cold remedy is ginger, lemon and honey. I’m not drawn to sage, but find that rosemary, oregano, and thyme help me.

    The medieval illustrations are GORGEOUS! Where did you find these books? Oh, forgive me, you work in a library. My daughter was a librarian before she had her children (now she is a stay-at-home mom), and would come up with wonderfully interesting books for us.

    I’m glad you have recovered, but not surprised, since you turned to nature for help. She provides all that we need for nourishment and healing.

    Blessings!

    Like

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